The Longest Day of the Year

LJH-Minden_Ensemble

CD cover art by Nancy Walker

It’s the longest day of the year! which was the working title for a piece we composed many years ago on the longest day of the year.

The song opens with a plaintive melody by Robert Minden heard on blown glass bottles and the twangy acoustic of repetitive plucked old guitar strings (a musical invention –  “string box ” by Dewi Minden as a gift to her father when she was twelve) then the easy voice of Carla Hallett singing an elegiac ode to the natural world. The sounds of tuned glass milk bottles and cider jugs played by Andrea and Dewi Minden provide the quirky textured ground of this dark environmental song. The piece was lovingly recorded at Vancouver’s historic Mushroom studios with engineer Simon Garber and released as “Alone Together” in 1992 on the album “Long Journey Home” by the Robert Minden Ensemble. 

“Take a listen to one of the most interesting musical entities on the planet and off-the-wall” – Gary Cristall.

 

Album Review

http://www.bcmusicianmag.com/what-is-your-name-cd-review-by-dave-o-rama/

Songs Online

The album is now available for download and streaming on several sites. Virtually Here:

11 lyrical story-based songs, quiet musings set to an unusual mix of familiar and unfamiliar resonant acoustic sound sources exploring hidden emotional realities concealed in the narrative of adoption and otherness.

Recorded in five sound studios in Vancouver, Banff and Toronto. Minden and Hallett’s music evokes a curious cinematic quality. Wonderfully layered arrangements reveal a colourful palette of acoustic sounds (blown tuned glass bottles are used extensively.) One finds oneself taken on a journey through an unexpected sonic environment interspersed with the affecting sound of musical saw and the whale-like watery calls of the waterphone that sometimes feels like a music from an imagined place. Hallett’s natural, delicate vocals are sensitive in timbre and resonance.  And the songs speak with a quiet, rebellious intensity.

Minden and Hallett

The Thing Itself

D3006

The CDs have just arrived -soon to be available online at all the major download places. Its handsome and sounds wonderful…clear voiced, open sound with a grand acoustic dynamic. Dynamite through good headphones. A tip of the hat to engineer Jeff Wolpert for a meticulous mix and mastering.

The actual CD (opposed to virtual) is in limited supply. Only a small quantity of glass mastered CDs were manufactured. If you are one of those who still like the actual you can send an email to otterbay@lostsound.com and one will be reserved for you.

Twenty dollars covers everything.  Send cheque to Otter Bay Productions, PO BOX 72041. Vancouver, BC V6R 4P2 and the CD will be sent to you immediately.

 

 

the space between theatre and music

just finished a complex mix of found sounds, voice, & piano. It was carefully constructed and built up in layers of repeated sounds of clay flower pots, struck tuned glass bottles, struck PVC pipe, carpenter’s saw, blown tuned wine and miniature liquor bottles and percussive piano with spoken word, then interrupted with lyrical piano and vocals. From one perspective it might be the soundscape of a modern dance work; from another it illuminates the space between theatre and music. It stands as the dramatic focal point of the album.  “The Courtroom”

 

a peek at some of the recording

2 performances in Toronto coming up end of May:

compositions for  waterphones, musical saws, tuned glass bottles and the dark vocals of Carla Hallett will celebrate the quiet side of the acoustic spectrum. Natural, quirky sound, rich in subtle hues and rough textures… strangely familiar and resonant.

Musideum  Saturday May 31 8:00PM                                                                                                        401 Richmond Street West, Suite 133  Toronto

Music Mondays Monday June 2 12:15 noon                                                                                      Church Of The Holy Trinity, 10 Trinity Square. Toronto

waterphone_mindenduo

recording a musical saw

Our unique instrumentation makes for a compelling array of varying timbres. Always seeking to expand the predictable sonic palette found in contemporary music, our recordings concentrate on  the colour and texture of acoustic sound. Much of the Duo’s focus is on timbre. The musical saw is an excellent example and is explored in all of our recordings. It has an unexpected voice and when placed with other sounds can offer acoustic surprise.

Listening to the sound of the musical saw in live performance is uncanny, the sound feels like it comes from everywhere/nowhere. Unlike a trumpet or a piano or a vocalist which have a direct point of origin the musical saw is strange because it seems to originate in the air itself.  In live performance the rubbing sound of the bow is diminished because the listener is not that close and one is not required to pay attention to it.  If one places a mic in front and close to the saw it amplifies the sound caused by the bow rubbing the blade and the delicate, mysterious sound of the saw is compromised and becomes confined.

The difficulty in recording the bowed saw is to recreate its ethereal experience. Experimenting over the years with many different mic positions and different ways of recording the saw, what seems crucial is the sound of the room itself. It is important to record in as resonant a room as possible using two microphones. Mic the sound in the room, as well as the closer sound coming from behind the player and the blade of the saw. Mixing both tracks together comes close to reproducing this extraordinary resonance.

Carla Hallett & Robert Minden - Trent University concert

Carla Hallett & Robert Minden – Trent University concert

 sruti box and musical saw