“Flying Horses” Robert Minden & Carla Hallett

flying_horses-minden&hallett-small copy
http://store.cdbaby.com/cd/robertmindenandcarlahallett

Sixty-nine blown glass bottles create an ensemble of breathy physical sound. With astonishing intonation, the bottle choir creates an almost creaturely presence. Then floating seemingly effortlessly above, soars a musical saw, (actually there are two – a high tenor and a low baritone) singing a mellifluous duet, evoking an other-worldly feel. And just when you think how cool it is to hear music made with curious things, a lonely call from a classic French horn sounds, out of the blue. The music ends with a surprising glissando from a waterphone, perhaps alluding to the impossible escape of flying horses from a gently slowing carousel.

sublime in headphones.

many thanks to:
Don Harder, recording, CBC Studio One, Vancouver
mixed and mastered by Jeff Wolpert, Desert Fish Studios, Toronto
Drawing by Nancy Walker

a curious mix

“Flying Horses” – other instruments make an appearance in this curious mix.
Floating over the bottle choir, 2 musical saws, (tenor and baritone) play a bittersweet duet. Then a vocal melody, sung through a vacuum cleaner hose spinning round and round. And surprise, a lonely call from the classic French horn is heard, first in the distance, and then closer, as the bottle choir continues its’ circular waltz until the liquid sounds of a waterphone draw the listener to another place.

get ready to waltz in a few days…..

instruments-flying horses2

recording a musical saw

Our unique instrumentation makes for a compelling array of varying timbres. Always seeking to expand the predictable sonic palette found in contemporary music, our recordings concentrate on  the colour and texture of acoustic sound. Much of the Duo’s focus is on timbre. The musical saw is an excellent example and is explored in all of our recordings. It has an unexpected voice and when placed with other sounds can offer acoustic surprise.

Listening to the sound of the musical saw in live performance is uncanny, the sound feels like it comes from everywhere/nowhere. Unlike a trumpet or a piano or a vocalist which have a direct point of origin the musical saw is strange because it seems to originate in the air itself.  In live performance the rubbing sound of the bow is diminished because the listener is not that close and one is not required to pay attention to it.  If one places a mic in front and close to the saw it amplifies the sound caused by the bow rubbing the blade and the delicate, mysterious sound of the saw is compromised and becomes confined.

The difficulty in recording the bowed saw is to recreate its ethereal experience. Experimenting over the years with many different mic positions and different ways of recording the saw, what seems crucial is the sound of the room itself. It is important to record in as resonant a room as possible using two microphones. Mic the sound in the room, as well as the closer sound coming from behind the player and the blade of the saw. Mixing both tracks together comes close to reproducing this extraordinary resonance.

Carla Hallett & Robert Minden - Trent University concert

Carla Hallett & Robert Minden – Trent University concert

 sruti box and musical saw

new recording of songs and found sounds

as I’m writing this I can hear the mellow sounds of the French Horn. Carla is writing a new line for the song we have been working on.

During the last month we have been living in a world of splendid acoustic sound: vintage waterphones, bowed saws, blown bottles, struck floating bowls, toy piano and voice.  Exploring the words and sounds of a new project which we plan to record in a month’s time. More about that soon.